Dog Days of Summer

During these dog days of summer, we hope readers will enjoy gazing at a selection of dogs from the NC Department of Cultural Resources’ collection and beyond.

H.1952.47.5

H.1952.47.5

credit: WCU Mountain Heritage Center

credit: WCU Mountain Heritage Center

Since dogs are traditional hunting companions, it may not be surprising to find an embossed dog motif on this leather shot flask. Accession records indicate that this example was found near Raleigh during the Civil War. The North Carolina state dog—the Plott hound—is a renowned hunting breed.  5 years ago Western Carolina University’s Mountain Heritage Center produced an exhibition on the the Plott hound. This show continues to travel (most recently to last year’s Plott Fest) and could be a popular and low-cost option for educational programming at your site.   The Center’s museum sales division produced this t-shirt for the exhibit and online merchandise.

H.19XX.330.63

H.19XX.330.63

H.1970.78.119A

H.1970.78.119A

H.1996.77.8

H.1996.77.8

In addition to hunting, dogs have filled other domestic roles. Perhaps this dog (above) alerted its owner when Fred Olds, founder of the NC Museum of History, visited the Cherokee reservation in 1908. As part of his basket-collecting mission, he had a photographer record this scene of “Aunt Lydia” Sands, whom he described as “the best woman fisher,” making fishing baskets on her porch. At the time of the photo, Sands’ dog “Surlagoochee” rested on the steps below. Dogs also provided affectionate companionship and could possibly (as in this advertising print above right) help with child rearing. Above left Governor Luther Hodges (1954-1961) pets his cocker spaniel.

H.1972.63.35

H.1972.63.35

H.1986.123.7

H.1986.123.7

Some craftsmen recreated dogs in objects ranging from decorative to whimsical. Woodcarver Jack Hall, who studied at the John C. Campbell Folk School, created this dog (left) in 1947. Annie Eaton Brower of Cary made dog cookies with this cutter (right), made by Moravian tinsmith G.A. Boozer in the mid 19th century. The retired proprietor of Hinshaw Yarns of Alamance County, Walter Hinshaw, fashioned the ornament below by sewing loops of machine braid together in the late 20th century.H.1993.194.1

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About collectionsconversations

This blog will contain posts from the C2C project staff on a variety of topics related to collections care and disaster preparedness. Enjoy the posts and let us know if you would like additional information or have a topic you would like for us to address.

Posted on July 29, 2014, in collections access, Exhibitions, museums and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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